Dog & Cat Articles

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Whether you have a dog, cat or both, our experts are here with all the information and tips you need. We use our Purina expertise to cover topics like dog and cat health, nutrition, behavior, training and more.

Fall Expertise: Dog & Cat Articles for Fall Safety
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Pets have spent all summer playing and bonding with their children. When the time comes to go back to school after summer vacation, kids aren’t the only ones experiencing those back-to-school blues.
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Halloween is more trick than treat for pets. The scary costumes, constant doorbell ringing and tempting candy can cause a lot of anxiety. Follow our experts’ Halloween pet safety tips here.
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Can dogs eat pumpkins, sweet potatoes and nuts? These ingredients are popular in fall holiday meals and treats and many people are tempted to share with their dogs. All three are safe, with a few caveats. Find out more here.
Recently Featured Dog & Cat Articles
Can Dogs Eat Blueberries
If you’ve ever wondered whether dogs can eat blueberries, Purina experts say yes! Find out what benefits this fruit offers and how to feed it to your dog in a safe way.
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Do dogs need to wear seatbelts in the car? Yes, but not all dog car seatbelts are created equal. Find out how to choose one and get other dog car safety tips from our experts here.
Disaster Preparedness
A pet emergency kit and disaster preparedness plan can help ensure you and your pet stay together in a worst-case scenario. Find out how to create your own pet disaster preparedness plan and emergency kit here.

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If you prefer your own diet to be natural or organic, you’re probably considering feeding your cat a natural or organic cat food, too. What’s the difference between the two, though, and how do you decide which is right for your cat? Find out here.
Don’t just assume your dog’s ears itch if he scratches them frequently. It may be a sign of a painful infection. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes: ear discharge, a strange odor and head shaking.
What do crystals in cat urine mean, and what can I do about it? A buildup of crystals may lead to a urinary tract problem.
Bladder stones in cats are rock-like minerals that form in the bladder. The correct name for them is “uroliths,” but a bladder stone by any name is a pain for your cat.
Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease or FLUTD is a common condition seen in cats.  Feline urinary tract disease can affect the urinary bladder (such as cystitis, an inflammation of the bladder) and the urethra, the channel that carries urine from the b
A seizure is sometimes described as an electrical storm in the brain. Brain cells, called neurons, communicate using electrical and chemical signals. A seizure, also referred to as a convulsion or “fit,” occurs when there is a sudden surge of electri
A healthy liver is essential for a healthy pet. Your pet’s liver is vital for metabolism and to get rid of toxic products.
Normal wear and tear on joints occurs daily. Cartilage protects your dog’s bones and joints from the friction caused by everyday movement. Natural glucosamine—a building block of cartilage tissue—can help maintain cartilage for healthy joints and mob
It’s not unusual for dogs to have occasional bouts of constipation or diarrhea that get better on their own. But if your dog has ongoing episodes, or if you see blood or mucous in your pet’s stool, consult a veterinarian.
Is your older cat high-strung? Does she lose weight but eat a lot? She may have an overactive thyroid. Older cats sometimes begin producing too much thyroid hormone. It’s a condition called feline hyperthyroidism.
You thought you were the only one in the family with high blood pressure? Dogs can suffer from hypertension, too, even though they often show no obvious clinical signs.
You thought you were the only one in the family with high blood pressure? Cats can suffer from hypertension, too, even though they often show no obvious clinical signs.